The Bee Book by Charlotte Milner

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Summary

If you want to grab the attention of a child, mention a Harry Potter reference and watch their eyes light up. That’s what author Charlotte Milner does in The Bee Book when she states that a “dumbledore” is a bumblebee. This fun fact presented with infographic flair will compel children to keep reading. Every page delivers interesting facts with engaging illustrations. Teachers will immediately recognize the value of using The Bee Book as a mentor text. Noting Milner’s craft for delivering information will inspire young nonfiction writers. Budding scientists will appreciate learning the significance of bees. Helpful solutions at the end of the book will inspire them to make a difference.

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Response to Literature

AASL Standards Framework for Learners: Inquire/Create: I.B.3. Learners engage with new knowledge by following a process that includes generating products that illustrate learning.

  • While reading the story, ask learners to pay close attention to how the author, Charlotte Milner, presents information. What do they notice?
  • Point to some of the illustrations in the book to help define the word “infographic”. Ask learners what they like about the way the information is presented in The Bee Book.  What was their favorite infographic?
  • Explain that they will create their own infographic on a topic they know all about.  They will use some of the ideas in the book for inspiration.  Younger learners can use poster paper, crayons and markers to present their information. Learners in grades three and higher can try using Piktochart; an AASL Best Website for Teaching and Learning,
  • Display infographics in the library.

Wondering about the waggle dance? Watch this video by the Smithsonian Channel.

Image Citation: Milner, Charlotte. “The Bee Book.” NetGalley, DK Children, 6 Feb. 2018, www.netgalley.com/.

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